OGRIP News

Another Successful Conference - Raising GIS to a New Level in Ohio!

keynoteThe DAS Ohio Geographically Referenced Information Program (OGRIP) Office partnered with the County Engineers Association of Ohio (CEAO) and the Ohio Chapter of Urban and Regional Information Systems Association (URISA) to bring Ohio and surrounding areas one of the biggest Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Conferences in the country. The 29th annual GIS Conference, which began September 23, 2019 and ran for three consecutive days, was hosted at Hyatt Regency Hotel in Columbus, Ohio. The event was kicked off by Keynote Speaker, Ismael Chivite, Environmental Systems Research Institute (Esri). In front of over 400 attendees, Mr. Chivite shared his passion regarding the importance of building ArcGIS products that help organizations use geography to improve the way they work.

Boasting a room full of vendors, hallways of eight different workshops and over 44 presentations to choose from, conference goers had a busy three days. Some of the must-see workshops to attend on the first day included, “Using GIS as a Stepping Stone,” by Mark Yandrick, City of Centerville. He discussed how the GIS Industry is rapidly growing and so are the professionals. Other presenters included Robbyn Abbitt, OGRIP Council Member from Miami University, who focused on mobile data collection using Esri’s Collector App and the web-based Survey 123 Platform. Christopher Goessi from Union Township Fire Department/City of Kettering shared important information about GIS data and analysis for fire departments.

gis.cioOGRIP’s very own Jennifer McFarland and Linda Slattery, Ohio EPA, curated a journey on what happens when you install Portal for ArcGIS and what you need to know. Events offered on the second day came from county and city GIS professionals: John Puente from the Ohio Department of  Transportation (ODOT) shared information about what happens after implementing an enterprise Asset Collection process and Katherine Robertson, from the same agency, talked about Cartographic Masking with ArcGIS Pro. Stark County’s GIS Department brought us Joe Guzi, who spoke about “GIS Outside of the Workplace.” Mike Edwards, City of Columbus, and Charlie Hickman, US Geological Survey, wrapped up day two by sharing the importance of LiDar at all levels of government.

A number of individuals, cities and counties were recognized for their outstanding participation in the Map Gallery Competition. A few of the winners were from ODOT’s GIS team, the Office of Technical Services, which took first place in Cartographer with the ODOT Official Transportation Map.
Greene County GIS and the City of Oberlin walked away with awards in the “2019 OGRIP Best Practices” category. 

Ringle.carnow.blackstoneClosing out the 29th annual GIS conference was Keynote Speaker Adam Carnow from Esri. His riveting presentation reminded the attending GIS professionals just how GIS is underutilized and how one might be able to remedy it. 

The OGRIP Office appreciates the work that CEAO and URISA does to contribute to this event every year and gives thanks to the many presenters and attendees for continuing to raise GIS to a new level in Ohio.

 

 

 

Meet the State’s New CIO Ervan D. Rodgers II

Beginning January 2019, Ervan D. Rodgers II, one of OGRIP’s Council members for many years, was appointed by Governor Mike DeWine to join the State’s Department of Administrative Services (DAS) to serve in the capacity of State Chief Information Officer and Assistant Director of DAS.

Prior to this appointment, Mr. Rodgers was the Chief Information Officer of the Ohio Attorney General’s Office from 2015 through 2018. In the past, he worked for Huntington National Bank, Columbus, as Vice President for Information Technology and as a technology consultant in Detroit. He served on the board of directors for HandsOn Central Ohio, a nonprofit resource referral agency; CyberOhio Advisory Board; and the Franklin University Cybersecurity and Public Safety Advisory Board.

Mr. Rodgers is from Lansing, Michigan and graduated from Spring Arbor University where he earned his bachelor’s degree in organizational leadership and is currently working on his master’s degree in computer science from Muskingum University.

 

Department of the Interior Appoints 14 Members to National Geospatial Advisory Committee

Department of the Interior Appoints 14 Members to National Geospatial Advisory Committee

Jan 09, 2017

https://www.fgdc.gov/ngac/news/doi-appoints-14-members-to-ngac-jan-2017.pdf

     The Department of the Interior has appointed 14 individuals to serve as members of the National Geospatial Advisory Committee (NGAC), which provides advice and recommendations on federal geospatial policy and management issues and the development of the National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI). The NSDI promotes sharing of geospatial data across all levels of government, the private and non-profit sectors, and the academic community.

…  The NGAC includes up to 30 members, selected to achieve a balanced representation of the varied interests associated with geospatial programs and technology. NGAC members are appointed to serve staggered terms on the committee. The 2017 appointees to three-year terms on the NGAC are:

 - Mr. Gar Clarke, State of New Mexico

 - Mr. Garet Couch, National Tribal Geographic Information Support Center

 - Ms. Patricia Cummens, ESRI (reappointed to a second term)

 - Mr. Stuart Davis, State of Ohio

 - Ms. Roberta Lenczowski, Roberta E. Lenczowski Consulting

 - Mr. Keith Masback, U. S. Geospatial Intelligence Foundation (reappointed …

 - Mr. Kevin Pomfret, Centre for Spatial Law and Policy (reappointed …

 - Major General William N. Reddel III, New Hampshire National Guard (reappointed …

 - Ms. Rebecca Somers, Somers-St. Claire GIS Management Consultants

 - Mr. Cy Smith, State of Oregon

 - Ms. Jennie Stapp, State of Montana

 - Ms. Julie Sweetkind-Singer, Stanford University (reappointed …

 - Dr. Harvey Thorleifson, State of Minnesota (reappointed …

 - Mr. Jason Warzinik, Boone County, Missouri (reappointed …

 

Ohio Statewide Imagery Program

The Ohio Geographically Referenced Information Program (OGRIP)  is pleased to announce the contract for the third iteration of the Ohio Statewide Imagery Program (OSIP III) has been awarded to Woolpert,  Inc., an Ohio based engineering and aerial imagery firm that will serve as the prime contractor for OSIP III.  Through OSIP the State will acquire high-resolution imagery to support the geospatial needs of state and local government service providers, Geographic Information System users, and decision makers at all levels of government.

As with previous OSIP projects, state and local government agencies are provided the opportunity to obtain additional product offerings through the State’s Cooperative Purchase Agreement (CPA) program. Through the OSIP contract the State has negotiated fixed costs for state and local government entities with an active CPA to obtain enhanced products and services. These optional deliverables may be purchased at any time throughout the life of the OSIP contract and are not subject to the delivery schedule for the statewide products.

Acquisition of OSIP imagery will begin in the spring of 2017 and continue through 2020.

For more information please go to:

http://ogrip.oit.ohio.gov/ProjectsInitiatives/StatewideImagery.aspx

 

GIS – THE REAL “G” IN NG9-1-1

The use of IP-enabled devices such as PCs, Tablets, Smart Phones, VOIP, and Vehicle Telematics are now the communications norm and citizens expect to be able to place a 9-1-1 call and receive help regardless of the technologies they choose. But legacy 9-1-1 systems are based on circuit switched telephony designed to carry voice only calls, and not the digital data these devices are capable of sending. So instead of a dispatcher being able to locate your phone by its GPS coordinates you must be able to communicate your location to the dispatcher.

Next Generation 9-1-1 (NG9-1-1) is a major redesign in the way 9-1-1 calls are delivered, which when fully implemented will rely on digital networks and geographic information to route calls to the appropriate Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) based on location information provided by the caller’s device. But having an accurate location does not mean emergency responders will be able to locate a caller unless the geographic information underpinning the system is:

AVAILABLE – The data exists and is readily accessible

MAINTAINED – Updated and Synchronized nightly

AUTHORITATIVE – Maintained by regulation or statute

ACCURATE – +/- 5 FT

INTEGRATED – Aggregated, Normalized and Seamless

 

 

NG9-1-1 READINESS

Most GIS data available to support NG9-1-1 is deficient in at least one of these areas, several are deficient in all five. A NG9-1-1 implementation requires specialized knowledge of spatial technologies, and few GIS departments have the necessary policies, procedures or infrastructure necessary to support the NG9-1-1 Spatial Information Function (SIF).

In Ohio the transition activities of over three-hundred 9-1-1 centers could be supported by creating a statewide SIF capability; relieving the need for local government to develop duplicative SIF infrastructure, support staff, procedures and policies.



 

THE SIF – A SPECIALIZED GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION

In NG9-1-1 the Spatial Information Function (SIF) relies on specialized GIS capabilities and interfaces to support emergency call routing and location validation for NG9-1-1.

The creation of a SIF requires a new level of commitment to GIS at the state and local levels including the development of new capabilities and workflows for GIS professionals to support the provisioning of GIS data to the SIF. There is no NG9-1-1 without GIS.



 

WHAT LOCAL GIS COORDINATORS CAN DO TO PREPARE FOR NG9-1-1

Learn about how NG911 works.

Forge relationships with local 9-1-1 personnel and stakeholder groups:

·   PSAP Managers

·   Local Addressing Authorities

·   Street Authorities

·   Telephone Service Providers

·   County and City GIS Professionals

·   NG9-1-1 Service Providers

All must be involved in the design and maintenance of the NG9-1-1 system for it to be successful.

Build first-cut data sets and enlist 911 personnel in data maintenance.

Ensure centerlines and address data meet or exceed the State’s LBRS standards.